» » » Take A Look At These Stricking Gothic Architechtural Structures

The Clock Tower, Wales (by Hefin Owen)
There is something spectacularly beautiful about Gothic architecture. Long-forgotten for many years, this style of structure has stood the test of time. Now, many modern buildings mimic the style or at least take inspiration from it. If you look at some contemporary structures, you will notice that they often have hints of Gothic style and elegance. For a long time, this architecture trend became unpopular. People believed that contemporary design was far more favorable than classic style. Over time, people have come back around to the idea of traditional buildings. They are now immensely popular in many European buildings, and so many new designers take head of the style in their work.

Before we take a look at some of the stunning architectural structures here, it is worth looking at the history of Gothic design. Some designers have taken inspiration from this style and incorporated it into residential buildings. It is not uncommon to see an architectural home that combines some of the characteristics you can see in the buildings here. The architecture school emerged way back in medieval times, when there were many new buildings popping up. The style comes from French origins, and so has many elements you see in modern French buildings. When you take a look at the style, you will find that there is a particular romantic element to it. Indeed, many of the buildings look like fairy tale castles.

The Clock Tower


First, let's look at the Clock Tower. This tower stands tall over the Mawddach estuary in Wales. As you can see, the location of the structure is romantic in that it stands on the edge of the land. If you take a look at some of the design styles here, you can see that the building dates back to the Victorian period in Britain. The architect probably took inspiration from French design and tried to put an Anglican twist on it. The stone structure has a pure slate roof, and so looks natural in the Welsh countryside. A family of mill-owners, the Lowe family, built the impressive building. They added the clock tower later as a simple addition to the gorgeous structure.

The Cathedral of Santa Maria of Palma, Mallorca (by Tobias Lindman)

The Cathedral of Santa Maria of Palma


If you have ever been to Mallorca, you will know that many of the buildings in the region take on this Gothic style. Much of the Catalan architecture is the same as French designs. That fact is unsurprising, given that the area is so close to France. This building has a deep connection to the vibrant art scene in Spain, though, and you should know about it. The famous architect, Antoni Gaudi, helped to design the Cathedral of Santa Maria. You may be familiar with Gaudi's work; he designed many of the breathtaking buildings in central Barcelona. You can see much of his architecture throughout Spain. This cathedral is one of his most-famous outside of Barcelona.

Royal Courts of Justice, London (by Duncan)

The Royal Courts of Justice


You might not think that London is the best place to see some of the world's most attractive buildings, but you are wrong. In fact, throughout central London, there are hundreds of stunning structures that you must see if you ever visit the city. The Royal Courts of Justice is just one example of exciting architecture in the English capital. The building took an epic eleven years to complete and now stands proudly in the city. Many tours will take you to this building, as it is one of the most glorious in the region. Queen Victoria was responsible for opening the building way back in 1882. Since then, the structure has gained fame across Europe for being a Gothic marvel.

Posted by Trung Thanh Le

Homedesignlove.com is an interior design and architecture blog that promises to deliver fresh new inspiration everyday. From the most amazing houses in the most amazing places on Earth (which by the way, cost millions) to redecorations on a budget or travel, we try to cover them all.
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